Developing a Teaching Portfolio

About the Course

explore - teaching portfolio

The teaching portfolio plays a critically important role in documenting one’s achievement as an academic teacher and assumes a key role in promotion processes. It is further a tool for reflecting upon ongoing professional learning and personal growth. The main goals of this course are to examine what constitutes university teaching of high quality and how to document as well as reflect on it through a teaching portfolio. The course pays special attention to the teaching philosophy, criteria for good teaching, and evidence in support of claims as to one's achievement. Discussion of samples and the provision of feedback constitute integral components of the course; following the course, optional one-to-one consultations to discuss teaching philosophy statements and portfolios are available on request.

Course Leaders

  • Mark GAN
  • Johan GEERTSEMA
  • Adrian LEE
  • LEE Kooi Cheng

For further information about the teaching portfolio course, please contact:

Mark GAN
Associate Director, CDTL
e-mail: cdtgjs@nus.edu.sg


Course Structure

Part 1: Demonstrating evidence of student learning

18 September 2019, 14:00-17:00

Synopsis

Teaching portfolios need to provide evidence of quality teaching. What are possible sources of such evidence? How do you demonstrate your impact? This session focuses on using multiple sources of evidence to reflect on and analyze teaching practice and student learning. We will consider how to gather and organize data, and drawing on actual examples, the session will guide participants in drafting their own impact narratives on teaching practice. 

This session invites you to explore the following questions:

  • How can assessment of your students' work provide evidence of student learning?
  • How can you collect, analyse, interpret and reflect on evidence of students’ learning to inform your teaching?
  • How can you incorporate and draw on multiple sources of evidence to provide a critical narrative of the impact of your teaching?

Course Leader:

  • Mark GAN
  • Adrian LEE



Part 2: Demonstrating evidence of leadership

23 October 2019, 14:00-17:00

Synopsis

As you get increasingly engaged in teaching, learning (and research), your teaching portfolio will likely evolve to include evidence of educational leadership. Developing educational leadership involves nurturing a supportive culture through sharing teaching practice with colleagues and/or the community. What are possible sources of such evidence? How do you demonstrate your impact? This session focuses on using multiple sources of evidence to reflect on educational leadership as a form of shared, distributed, collegial and inquiry-based practice, which goes beyond positions of authority. We will draw on actual examples to guide participants in drafting their own impact narratives on educational leadership.


This session invites you to explore the following questions:

  • How can you inquire into and share your teaching practice by making it public?
  • What are your contributions to educational leadership and how can you document them?
  • How can you draw on multiple sources of evidence to provide a critical narrative of your educational leadership contributions?


Course Leader:

  • Mark GAN
  • LEE Kooi Cheng 

Register


Part 3: Bringing it together

27 November 2019, 14:00-17:00

Synopsis

This session will focus on the teaching portfolio as a tool for critical inquiry, reflection and continuous personal growth. Participants will take stock of their own teaching practice in order to articulate strategies as well as the beliefs and goals that underpin them. They will relate their practice to some of the criteria and standards for good university teaching. The session will consist of hands-on opportunities to engage in critical self-reflection and participants will be guided through the process of drafting (or revising their current) teaching philosophy statement with the use of examples.


This session invites you to explore the following questions:

  • How can you engage in critical reflection on your own academic practice, with specific reference to teaching?
  • What are the criteria for good university teaching and how do they connect with guiding principles and values in higher education?
  • How and why would you draft / revise a teaching philosophy statement?


Course Leader:

  • Mark GAN
  • Johan GEERTSEMA

Register